Book Review: Made from Scratch

Made from Scratch: Discovering the Pleasures of a Handmade Life

This book is lovely memoir written by 20-something web designer Jenna Woginrich.  Working as a web designer, Jenna longed to have a homestead and become self-sufficent.  With the help of farming friend, Jenna chronicles her journey of trying to create an urban homestead.  Her honest accounts are humorous, entertaining and at times, poignant.  She contiues to work a full time job while bee-keeping, raising angora rabbits for fiber to spin and egg-laying chickens, planting a vegetable garden and sewing clothes from scratch.  Each chapter looks at a different aspect of homesteading, and offers Jenna’s personal account, as well as some advice on how to get started yourself.  There’s tons of fantastic resources listed in the back for those who get the urge to homestead themselves.

Jenna now has her own farm in New York state, and a blog about it: Cold Antler Farm.  Personally, I still love city life, but I can live out in the country vicariously through this book and her blog.  While I’ll probably never adapt all the aspects of homesteading she discusses in my life (sled dogs in Florida anyone?)  I found great inspiration through reading about Jenna’s journey, and I even got inspired to bake my first ever loaves of bread from scratch:

Even if you can only incorporate a few aspects of the handmade life into your own life, it really, truly is so deeply satisfying.

Note: I was not compensated in any way for this review.  I borrowed the book from my local library and loved it, thus I’m reviewing it here.

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About Diana

Style maven, knitter, crafter, seamstress, one who does not walk the beaten path.
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5 Responses to Book Review: Made from Scratch

  1. alechia says:

    Very nice bread Diana!!!! I’m very proud!

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  2. Natalie says:

    Sounds like an interesting read. It’s amazing how many self-sufficient abilities and talents are becoming obsolete, isn’t it? I had a friend teach me how to make jam and can peaches a few years ago, and there’s such a sense of accomplishment that comes from it.

    That’s some pretty impressive looking bread!!

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  3. Tara says:

    I read an excerpt from this in a magazine a while ago but wasn’t sure it really applied to me (especially in Florida). Sometimes I think Florida is so difficult to be sustainable in because of the poor sub/urban planning and our extra dependence on electricity (air)…Perhaps I should give this book a chance. I am making a list of books to read during this school year to challenge my kids – I will put this on the list!

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  4. GingerR says:

    I love homemade bread and home grown vegetables, but I don’t want to live in a world where that’s the only way I can get them, or where someone else turns up their nose at me if I choose not to spend my time producing them.

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  5. I just baked bread recently too, for the first time since I was about 14. I was inspired by The Art of Eating In, but I love homesteading books as well. I have a copy of the Urban Homestead, which I’ve used for composting help and making a raised-bed garden. That book is more of a how-to book though, so I’d be interested in a memoir on this subject. Thanks for the review!

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